Duration: 
4 - 6 hours
Self Tests Included: 
YES
Final Exam Included: 
YES

Supported Scaffold User Hazard Awareness Training is intended for any and all persons who use a scaffold to access their work.


Price: 
$99.00
Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION Video Duration: 7m 54s
Lesson 1: Scaffold Overview [Preview]

A scaffold is any temporary elevated platform and its supporting structure that is used to support workers, users or both. Supported scaffolds are scaffolds that are supported by rigid means like a column, a post, a leg or a rigid tube. The three types of supported scaffolds are tube & coupler, frame and systems scaffold.

Lesson 2: Osha Scaffold Fatality Study [Preview]

OSHA records statistics regarding construction fatalities and injuries in the United States. Each year, fatalities attributed to scaffolding account for approximately 20% construction related deaths according to OSHA. The majority of fatalities and injuries from scaffold are due to five common and serious hazards that are easily preventable with the proper training.

FOUNDATIONVideo Duration: 9m 59s
Lesson 3: Supported Scaffold Foundation [Preview]

A foundation is the basic support for the scaffold. It is whats holding up the scaffold, and has to be strong enough to support the weight of the scaffold. Similar to that of a building or a house, if the foundation is not sturdy, the structure that sits up on it is also not sturdy.

Lesson 4: Scaffold Base Plates and Sills [Preview]

A base plate is typically a square piece of metal with a stem on it so that it can fits inside the scaffold leg. It may have holes on the bottom of it which allow it to be attached to other members such as a sill. A sill helps to distribute the load to the foundation that the scaffold is setting on.

Lesson 5: Scaffold Stability [Preview]

Scaffold stability typically refers to its ability to resists side-to-side and back-to-forth movement. The stability of a scaffold can be ensured using various methods depending on the situation. Free standing scaffolds cannot exceed a specific base to height ratio. Scaffold that exceeds this ratio must be properly secured to an adjacent structure or secured to the ground.

Lesson 6: Proper Scaffold Tie [Preview]

Scaffold legs can handle much heavier vertical loads than they can horizontal loads. To prevent horizontal movement, scaffolds stabilized by an adjacent structure must be attached to that structure using proper ties. Ties stabilize the scaffold by incorporating both a push and pull component. This prevents the scaffolds from both falling into and away from the structure.

FALLING OBJECTSVideo Duration: 2m 19s
Lesson 7: Fall Objects Protection [Preview]

A scaffold is any temporary elevated platform and its supporting structure that is used to support workers,users or both. Supported scaffolds are scaffolds that are supported by rigid means like a column, a post, a leg or a rigid tube. The three types of supported scaffolds are tube & coupler, frame and systems scaffold.

ELECTROCUTIONVideo Duration: 0m 40s
Lesson 8: Electrocution Protection [Preview]

Electrocution is one of the most common scaffold hazards users and erectors face while utilizing scaffold on a job site. The deceiving part about electrocution is that a wire does not have necessarily come in contact with a scaffold to pass current through it. Regardless of the voltage carried in a power line, a scaffold must stay a minimum distance away from it to prevent electrocution.

GUARDRAILSVideo Duration: 5m 25s
Lesson 9: Height Requirements for Guardrails [Preview]

Scaffold guardrails are the horizontal members placed in between the scaffold legs which restrain the users from falling off the scaffold. Scaffold guardrails typically consists of a rail at or a little above waist height, and a rail in the middle of the top rail and the platform. The platform heights at which guardrails are required vary across the numeric governing agencies.

Lesson 10: Top and Mid Rails Installation [Preview]

Scaffold guardrail systems typically consists of a rail at or a little above the waist height which is known as the top rail, and a rail in the middle of the top rail and the platform which is known as tie mid rail. There are minimum loads and maximum deflection thresholds these rails must adhere in order to be considered adequate for all restraint.

PLATFORM CONSTRUCTIONVideo Duration: 4m 46s
Lesson 11: Platform Dimensions Requirements [Preview]

A scaffold platform is essential part of any supported scaffold because it is the surface that you use to reach your work area. A properly built scaffold platform consists of a surface typically constructed with either wood planks or aluminum planks. There are many factors that determine the proper construction of the platform so that it can be utilized safely.

Lesson 12: Special Wood Planks Requirements [Preview]

Wood scaffold planks are typically 2x10 or 2x12 and vary in length depending on the work being performed. Scaffold planks need to be installed such that they do not fall off their supports. There are minimum and maximum requirements which determine overhang and overlap of scaffold planks to ensure they do not move while in use and create a potential hazard.

SCAFFOLD ACCESS Video Duration: 7m 06s
Lesson 13: Ladders, Stairways and Stair Towers [Preview]

When accessing a platform that is more than 24 inches above or below another platform, ground, or floor that you're coming from, safe access must be provided. Safe access can be acheived using various types of equipment including portable ladders, ladders that attach to the scaffolding, and stairways amoungst others. When used properly, these items provide adequate and safe means of accessing a scaffold.

Lesson 14: Scaffold Ramps and Access Frames [Preview]

Similar to stairways, portable and attachable ladders; ramps and integral prefabricated scaffold access frames also provide safe means of accessing a platform that is more than 24 inches above or below another platform, ground or floor that you're coming from. Access ramps must conform to maximum slope and minimum width requirements, while access frames must also conform to numerous standards to provide safe access.

SCAFFOLD USEVideo Duration: 2m 38s
Lesson 15: Scaffold Use Guidelines [Preview]

Scaffold use for a Scaffold User consists of recognizing the various hazards that are associates with the scaffold, and simply being aware of your limitations as a Scaffold User. Scaffold Users are just that --users!They are not qualified to erect, dismantle, or manipulate the scaffold in a way. Scaffold Users should use their training to proactively identify scaffold in any way. Scaffold Users should use their training to proactively identify scaffold hazards and notify the Competent Person so appropriate remedies can be made.

 

What You Learn

The training presented in this course is in accordance with the requirements set forth in OSHA 29 CFR 1926.454(a)(1-5) “The employer shall have each employee who performs work while on a scaffold trained by a person qualified in the subject matter to recognize the hazards associated with the type of scaffold being used and to understand the procedures to control or minimize those hazards. The training shall include the following areas, as applicable: the nature of any electrical hazards, fall hazards and falling object hazards in the work area; the correct procedures for dealing with electrical hazards and for erecting, maintaining, and disassembling the fall protection systems and falling object protection systems being used; the proper use of the scaffold, and the proper handling of materials on the scaffold; the maximum intended load and the load-carrying capacities of the scaffolds used; and any other pertinent requirements of this subpart.”

What You Receive

Upon successfully completing the training and scoring a minimum of 70% on the final exam, students will receive a printable certificate of completion along with a wallet card for their records. Students can access their account at any time to reprint their certificate and/or wallet card in the event that they become lost.

Frequently Asked Questions

1
  • Who is required to take scaffold user hazard awareness training?

    Everyone who works on a scaffold is required to have user training per OSHA 29 CFR 1926.454(a).

2
  • Was this course developed by a person qualified in the subject matter of scaffolding as required by OSHA 29 CFR 1926.454(a)?

    Yes, this course was developed by David H. Glabe, P.E. who is recognized as the foremost scaffolding expert in the United States.

3
  • Is this training considered “competent person” training?

    This is step one in becoming a competent person, but it is not comprehensive competent person training. Competent person training takes a minimum of 16 hours to complete.

4
  • Do you have to be a Competent Person as defined by OSHA to use a scaffold?

    No, users who receive user training can use a scaffold.

5
  • What is the difference between “competent person” and user scaffold training?

    A scaffold User is one who can recognize the hazards associated with a scaffold. A Competent Person is one who is knowledgeable of the specific OSHA regulations, can recognize hazards, and can determine the structural integrity of the scaffold.

1-855-OSHA-TRN (1-855-674-2876) [email protected]
POWERED BY DH GLABE & ASSOCIATES
 
All Rights Reserved. © Copyright 2013. Daryel Ann, LLC dba DH Glabe & Associates. 8753 Yates Drive, Suite 200, Westminster, Colorado 80031
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